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Thread: Stephen King

  1. #151
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSunshine View Post
    I hated CELL too. I couldn't even get through it. I swear it was just a first draft and the publishers said, yep, it's Stephen King, looks good enough. But man, that was some bad writing.

    I also have a theory that King's books got really bad once he stopped taking cocaine. His coke novels have a feverish intensity to them, then after he got clean they just started to plod along.

    I also think it's ironic that his last great book, MISERY, was about an author. It was almost like King died (in a creative sense) when Misery did. The next book was THE TOMMYKNOCKERS. Need I say more?

    I do have to say though that DUMA KEY was really enjoyable. A fine return to form.

    Almost all of his books are about authors. He is one of the most self obsessed writers ever.
    I think Tommyknockers was written when he was in the depth of addiction. Alot of people think his writing is much more lean and tight since he sobered up. The last one i read was Bag of Bones. It was okay although I'd heard it was really good.
    I did love his first stuff though.

  2. #152
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    Quote Originally Posted by endsleigh03 View Post
    I was looking at "The Mist" thread and thought I'd do this one on Stephen King, he's a neat Findadeath fit.
    What's your Favorite King book/books?
    My favorites were "It" and "Salems lot". (That part where the boy was hanging and scratching at the window scared me to death)
    My favorite books are "It," "'Salem's Lot" and "The Stand." I've always enjoyed his short-story collections. "Salem's Lot" was the first book I read. It was borrowed from a neighbor and very carefully sneaked home. My parents forbade his books at that time. (I was 12).

  3. #153
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    Quote Originally Posted by keeunjames View Post
    Almost all of his books are about authors. He is one of the most self obsessed writers ever.
    I think Tommyknockers was written when he was in the depth of addiction. Alot of people think his writing is much more lean and tight since he sobered up. The last one i read was Bag of Bones. It was okay although I'd heard it was really good.
    I did love his first stuff though.
    King has said that he was at the height of his addiction(s) during the writing of "Rose Madder." He says now he doesn't even remember writing it.

    Of his middle and later periods, I love "Gerald's Game" and its sequel "Dolores Claiborne," also "The Girl Who Loved Tom Gordon."



  4. #154
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    I remember reading The Mist on a train one night. Scared me but I was just a kid. The movie was excellent.
    I lived on the Baffin Island the summer i was 18 ans I read Salem's Lot. I rember walking home one night scared shitless that vampires were going to jump out of every abandoned deep freeze. Only note this because summers on the Baffin Island it never gets dark. Broad daylight and I was freaked still.

  5. #155
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    I think 'Salem's Lot' was his most frightening novel ever. It still gives me nightmares, the whole floating at the window tapping thing, also the line (when the child comes upon the vampire on the short cut home), instead of describing what happens, King says "The rest was unspeakable." I've never forgotten that line in 30 years, it froze me with terror.



  6. #156
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    Quote Originally Posted by keeunjames View Post
    I remember reading The Mist on a train one night. Scared me but I was just a kid. The movie was excellent.
    I lived on the Baffin Island the summer i was 18 ans I read Salem's Lot. I rember walking home one night scared shitless that vampires were going to jump out of every abandoned deep freeze. Only note this because summers on the Baffin Island it never gets dark. Broad daylight and I was freaked still.

    what did you think about the very ending of the movie (The Mist)-obviously different that the story-if he had just waited another 2 minutes huh?????

  7. #157
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ghoulie Girl View Post
    what did you think about the very ending of the movie (The Mist)-obviously different that the story-if he had just waited another 2 minutes huh?????

    I thought it was devastating. I don't understand why the film didn't do better.

  8. #158
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    Quote Originally Posted by keeunjames View Post
    I thought it was devastating. I don't understand why the film didn't do better.
    the whole movie was pretty good-followed along with the book until THEN..

  9. #159
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    Love me some Stephen King!
    The first book I read of his was Firestarter- I was 8. My mom gave it to me.
    Currently my favorite book is It, I've read it more times than I can count. The movie-miniseries- was good, not great, but Tim Curry was fantastic!
    The Shining still freaks me out and is still about the only horror movie that scares me to death.
    I also liked his stuff as Richard Bachman- anyone else like Rage or the Long Walk?
    Little fact about me- I have the original artwork from the first printing of Nightmares and Dreamscapes tattooed on my shoulder- the half sun/ half moon thing.

  10. #160
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    "You know, since he died, Aaron Spelling has only 4 shows in development. Kinda like when Stephen King got hit by the car, and it stopped him from writing for 2 hours, because he lost his pen..."

    Andy Kindler

  11. #161
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeChick View Post
    Mrs. Sarah Winchester was the wife of Oliver Winchester of Winchester rifle fame. After the death of both her husband and her child, Sarah Winchester felt that her family was cursed and began contacting mediums and spiritualists. These people told her that her family was cursed with all the deaths caused by the Winchester rifle...

    You can read more about the strange goings on here and see why it would inspire King:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarah_L._Winchester

    Here are a few of the pictures I took on our tour there a few years ago:

    The first is of the Million Dollar Storage Room. It's called that because Mrs. Winchester designed many of the Tiffany windows in the home herself (many including symbols showing her fascination with the number 13) and these were never put up. At the time, they cost $25,000 and are said to be worth at least a million dollars today. See the little orbs dancing around the windows there?:



    The next picture is of our tour group walking through the Seance Room where Mrs. Winchester would get inspiration from the spirits on where and how to build on her constantly growing home each night between midnight and two a.m. More orbs around the stairs:



    This next set of photos I sent to the Ghosthunters to see if they could debunk them as odd light anomalies or something of that nature. Their answer was no, they couldn't.

    The pictures were taken in Mrs. Winchester's bedroom as I was taking a set of three photos to get the whole room in. I lagged behind the tour also to get the pictures with no people in them so no one else was in the room. The first picture is what I saw when uploading the pics originally. The next is cropped-not altered in any way-to give a closer view of what I saw.

    There appear to be the faces of two men directly under the lamp in the mirror. The reflection in the lower half of the picture is of me/my camera kneeling down to take the picture. The other reflection is that of a plaque that's on the blank wall opposite the mirror and much lower than the lamp. One full face (on the left) with full beard and distinct features. The face on the right shows a prominent nose, mouth and beard. Eyes can also be seen on the man on the right but they're not as noticeable.:

    The first link here is of the original shot. I guess we're not allowed to put this many images in one post and I didn't realize it. Anyway, there you go for comparison's sake:





    If you're ever in town, make sure to take a tour there. The stories of what went on in the house during Mrs. Winchester's life there and after her death are quite interesting. It's got the Stephen King stamp of approval to boot.
    AWESOME PHOTOS!!
    I went to the Winchester House when I was a kid, and that visit is one of my coolest vacation memories! I took tons of pictures, but I never captured anything in them. I would love to go back there sometime!

  12. #162
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    I love King's work! Pet Sematary is a long time favorite. It scared the life outta me. Night Shift and Skeleton Crew are my favorite short story collections. Least favorite: Bag of Bones. It started out great but just seemed to fizzle out.

    It's funny, I like different SK books for different times of the year. For example, Fall means it's time to pull out Pet Sematary. Gerald's Game is for summer.

  13. #163
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    The first King I read was Salem's Lot and it scared me to death. I finished it at 4:30AM and could not sleep at all, though I had to be at work at 7AM. I was in my early 20s.

    My faves are IT, The Stand--both of which I have read at least four times each and am planning to read them again soon--Cujo, Carrie, The Body, The Mist, and Thinner.

    I could not get into Insomnia or Dream Catcher. And I just have not even tried his most resent books. Dean Koontz is much more consistantly frightening.

  14. #164
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    Stephen King is a national treasure. He's given so much entertainment to so many. Sorry if this was posted earlier, but what was it he was addicted to?

    Oh, and favorite? The Stand, no question. I enjoy apocalypse. The edited version though. I got the unedited with great anticipation....then realized that, well, even Stephen King needs an editor.
    Last edited by Noelle Page; 10-22-2008 at 02:11 PM.

  15. #165
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    Quote Originally Posted by cindyt View Post
    The first King I read was Salem's Lot and it scared me to death. I finished it at 4:30AM and could not sleep at all, though I had to be at work at 7AM. I was in my early 20s.

    My faves are IT, The Stand--both of which I have read at least four times each and am planning to read them again soon--Cujo, Carrie, The Body, The Mist, and Thinner.

    I could not get into Insomnia or Dream Catcher. And I just have not even tried his most resent books. Dean Koontz is much more consistantly frightening.
    Yeah, Insomnia was hard to get into, but it did turn out to be an interesting read. It surprised me.
    Cujo---YES! I almost forgot about that one! Great piece of writing there! I might need to re-read that one soon.

  16. #166
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    Quote Originally Posted by Noelle Page View Post
    Stephen King is a national treasure. He's given so much entertainment to so many. Sorry if this was posted earlier, but what was it he was addicted to?

    Oh, and favorite? The Stand, no question. I enjoy apocalypse. The edited version though. I got the unedited with great anticipation....then realized that, well, even Stephen King needs an editor.
    Yeah, a lot of cocaine and also booze in extreme excess too, I believe. He gave the term "functioning" a fresh, shiny patina.



  17. #167
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    I love him! I have tons of his books! I'm excited because SK has another short story book coming out in November! YAY!

  18. #168
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSunshine View Post
    I was really surprised about all the booze, because that's a lot harder to hide then coke. Some people I know seem like they are on coke and they're just super hyperactive.

    I can't believe King is 61. He's a senior citizen!
    I know, Stephen King, elderly. It's hard to get your head around!



  19. #169
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSunshine View Post
    He wrote about being 61 on his website, and he's having a hard time getting his head around it too! He experienced success at such a young age (he was 26 when Carrie was published) so it feels like he's always been here.

    I can't wait for his new short story collection either. Apparently after editing the Best American Short Stories 2007 anthology it reignited his love for the form.

    His son Joe Hill writes some amazing short stories too. Check out 'Pop Art', one of the most devastatingly beautiful short stories I've ever read.
    I knew his wife Tabitha was publishing now, but didn't know about his son. I most certainly will check his stuff out. King's new collection you reference contains both new material and previously-published (but not in book form) short stories, such as "The Gingerbread Girl." I too cannot wait.

    An interesting parallel: Anne Rice's son Christopher Rice is also an excellent writer; his debut novel "A Density of Souls" knocked my socks off; similar in theme to King's "Carrie," it really is superb, as are his subsequent novels. I highly recommend him!



  20. #170
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    My favorites are IT and The Stand. IT scared the shit out of me. It's the only book besides The Amityville Horror that actually scared me. I couldn't even finish Amityville--had to throw it in the trash and then was convinced it was glowing red.

    The last Stephen King I read was From a Buick 8. It wasn't the worst, but it was nowhere near his early stuff.

  21. #171
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    I thought 'Carrie' was an outstanding novel. Not only did it frighten me as a teenager, it also validated some of those feelings of alienation that we all have at that age. I never forgot it.

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    My fav was the Talisman...excellent novel

  23. #173
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    Thanks DR & I'm glad you enjoyed the pics Jingly. We've been meaning to get back there but still haven't.

    This gives me the idea that we might find the perfect excuse in planning this year's fam holiday activities. My MIL might bitch about all the tiny stairs but she'll get over it, when she sees the windows I think, lol.

    I've heard King's latest on audiobook and while I enjoy them I still stand by The Stand, dammit!

    *Pounds fist on desk for emphasis like a dope, as if anyone can hear it through their computer speakers.
    .

    Life goes on.

  24. #174
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeChick View Post
    Thanks DR & I'm glad you enjoyed the pics Jingly. We've been meaning to get back there but still haven't.

    This gives me the idea that we might find the perfect excuse in planning this year's fam holiday activities. My MIL might bitch about all the tiny stairs but she'll get over it, when she sees the windows I think, lol.

    I've heard King's latest on audiobook and while I enjoy them I still stand by The Stand, dammit!

    *Pounds fist on desk for emphasis like a dope, as if anyone can hear it through their computer speakers.
    *Laughs at - Stands by The Stand, Dammit!

  25. #175
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jack-O-Lantern View Post
    I knew his wife Tabitha was publishing now, but didn't know about his son. I most certainly will check his stuff out. King's new collection you reference contains both new material and previously-published (but not in book form) short stories, such as "The Gingerbread Girl." I too cannot wait.

    An interesting parallel: Anne Rice's son Christopher Rice is also an excellent writer; his debut novel "A Density of Souls" knocked my socks off; similar in theme to King's "Carrie," it really is superb, as are his subsequent novels. I highly recommend him!
    Read Small World and The Trap by Tabitha King. Awesome. She's been a published author for years, but these two are her best, IMO, mystery and horror.

  26. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by cindyt View Post
    Read Small World and The Trap by Tabitha King. Awesome. She's been a published author for years, but these two are her best, IMO, mystery and horror.
    Both she and Joe have done well, like them both.
    Wonder what it was like for them to release the first books with Husband and Dad being who he is. Must have been a little nervy.

  27. #177
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    I ran across this today but haven't had time to check it out. Have any of you seen it yet? If so, what did you think? http://www.simonsays.com/specials/st...sref=3&num=605
    .

    Life goes on.

  28. #178
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    Quote Originally Posted by AaronVail View Post
    "You know, since he died, Aaron Spelling has only 4 shows in development. Kinda like when Stephen King got hit by the car, and it stopped him from writing for 2 hours, because he lost his pen..."

    Andy Kindler
    I think it was Letterman who said King was in NYC for a book signing. He doesn't just sign your book, he writes you one.

  29. #179
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    When you think about it he has writen absolutley loads of books, It also seems to me that most have been made into movies. Some good some not so good. My first was 'Pet Semetary' loved the book, hated the movie. Best movie was the Green Mile. did he also write Sawshank Redemption, if so, another classic.
    Death is natures way of telling you to take it easy.

  30. #180
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    Quote Originally Posted by letty1970 View Post
    When you think about it he has writen absolutley loads of books, It also seems to me that most have been made into movies. Some good some not so good. My first was 'Pet Semetary' loved the book, hated the movie. Best movie was the Green Mile. did he also write Sawshank Redemption, if so, another classic.
    He did write The Shawshank Redemption. It was one of the novellas in (I think) Four Seasons. Apt Pupil and Stand By Me (The Body) were also in that collection. Apt Pupil is a horrifying story. Not a very good movie. I did like Pet Semetary. The Mist was a great story and movie.

  31. #181
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    He has one of the cleverest minds out there, a bit fucked up sometimes but what an imagination. I feel the same way about Quentin Tarrantino, brilliant but mad.
    Death is natures way of telling you to take it easy.

  32. #182
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    Quote Originally Posted by keeunjames View Post
    He did write The Shawshank Redemption. It was one of the novellas in (I think) Four Seasons. Apt Pupil and Stand By Me (The Body) were also in that collection. Apt Pupil is a horrifying story. Not a very good movie. I did like Pet Semetary. The Mist was a great story and movie.
    When I think about it, "The Mist" was actually one of my favorite film adaptations of a King book (or short story, in this case). I thought it was riveting, and (nihilist that I am) I loved the ending, because it seemed quite realistic as well as incredibly ironic.
    "Carrie" and "Misery" are two of the other excellent book-to-film adaptations out there...



  33. #183
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    I loved "The Cell". I'm sure if they plan on making it a movie they will screw it up. I have a low attention span, but the book kept me interested from the start.

  34. #184
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    One of my favourite of his stories is The Running Man. They changed it and cast Arnie in the movie but even that was good.
    The Lawnmower Man has to be one of the worst adaptions. I believe Stephen King wanted his name off the credits. Also It was pretty lame. The book was okay but that was during his looooooooong phase where each secondary character got a twenty page bio. Never saw The Tommyknockers but it took me about a year to read the book.

  35. #185
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    Quote Originally Posted by gemini33 View Post
    I loved "The Cell". I'm sure if they plan on making it a movie they will screw it up. I have a low attention span, but the book kept me interested from the start.
    I saw the commercials for M Night Shamalan's "THE HAPPENING" and instantly thought of THE CELL, haven't seen it but the concept seemed the same, I'm with you I liked the book, Lisey's story was okay but I really liked Duma Key

  36. #186
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    My first book to read of his was Carrie. I was hooked after that and became his number one fan until he wrote Misery and then I pretended I was his number two fan because I didn't want to be like Kathy Bates in the movie. haha!
    I cried for shoes .... til I met a man with no feet.


  37. #187
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    Big fan here, where do I start.. love Christine, Carrie, It, The Shawshank Redemption.. one hell of a talented author.

  38. #188
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    The only Stephen King book that I have ever been able to read all the way through, was Thinner... and it creeped me the f*ck out.


    When platform shoes would do a world of good.

  39. #189
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    Quote Originally Posted by tuesdays_jupiter View Post
    The only Stephen King book that I have ever been able to read all the way through, was Thinner... and it creeped me the f*ck out.

    That was a good one. Another bad movie if memory serves me.


  40. #190
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    The Shining, and Pet Sematery. Bad ass movies, but good books!
    You are not a color to me. You are not a religion,sexual orientation, age or IQ. You are not a male or female. You are not political, nor pretty or ugly. You are my brother and sister, and I love you no matter what you may be.-I was Goth before they called it Goth.

  41. #191
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    He is a very srange looking man.
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  42. #192
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    Quote Originally Posted by SomeChick View Post
    I ran across this today but haven't had time to check it out. Have any of you seen it yet? If so, what did you think? http://www.simonsays.com/specials/st...sref=3&num=605
    Thanks for sharing! I couldn't hear it, but the N series looks good.

  43. #193
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSunshine View Post
    Still...reading...Christine...when...will...it...end........
    Oh, it's only about 500 pages. Until you try to read The Stand (1,141
    pages on paperback) quit whining.

  44. #194
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    I have been an avid (rabid) fan since I was a preteen. Pet Semetary is my favorite followed closely by Geralds Game. All his stuff rocks though. Okay, I lied. The girl who loved Tom Gordon was kinda lame IMO. lol
    ~smoochies~

  45. #195
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    I have a low attention span. A book really has to keep me interested if it's over a 100 pages. That's why I prefer SK's short story books. I have a dozen novels by SK. All of them, except one has multiple character story lines. That aspect keeps me interested.

  46. #196
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSunshine View Post
    I have The Stand sitting on my nightstand, and I'm very aware everyone says it's his best, but I don't have the stamina at the moment. I'm going on vacation to Mexico in Feb- maybe I'll save it until I'm by the pool.

    I'm going to sound crazy now too, but it's really hard to read a large book comfortably, especially towards the beginning and the end. It's hard to hold it up. Maybe I could get the Stand on Sony E-reader.

    I do sound like a whinge don't I?
    Geez. The Stand is my fave. I read it at least 5 times as a teen. I think I might go out and get a copy.
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  47. #197
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    Go for the unabridged version. I dont remember any difference really but hey what the fuck right!
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  48. #198
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    No I havent read anything by him since The Tommyknockers.
    A new commandment I give to you, that you love one another: just as I have loved you, you also are to love one another.

  49. #199
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    Quote Originally Posted by KCSunshine View Post
    Have you read the dark tower books?
    Dark Tower is a strange ride indeed...took him over 20 years to finish them, and you can tell.....I`d sell you mine in a heartbeat....The Stand, the long-er version only introduces one more character....I recommend the original....Stephen has a way of running off at the typewriter, which he gleefully admits...LOL....The Stand is a classic.....I`m 45 and have read all his stuff for over 30 years now....I believe I posted this before, but the early Stephen was The King, if you will....somewhere down the line it became pap to sell to the masses

  50. #200
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    ......on a side note...The Dark Tower was orginally written for his daughter Naomi....she was little and bitched her dad never wrote anything she could read.....there were only 5 to 10 thousand orginally printed, for friends and close friends, if my memory serves me correct.....now if you can find one of those copies, you`d be RICH.....too bad he didn`t leave it at that one....The Green Mile, is one of his later works that resonated with the old fan base because it was the old King.....I loved those books, and the movie was extremely well done

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